Tooth Stop Rest

Cutters held in the lathe chuck, collet, or between lathe centers can be ground quickly and accurately with the Versa-Mil unit equipped with an external or internal grinding head. The tooth stop rest (Figure 9-5) assures uniform grinding of cutter teeth because the finger on the gage ratchets over the teeth stopping each tooth in the exact same position. The tooth stop rest is completely adjustable for height and position. The diamond dresser (Figure 9-6) is used with all Versa-Mil grinding...

Wheel Dressing

Wheel dressing (Figure 9-37) with the diamond dresser is a must for accurate precision grinding. Dress wheels before starting any grinding job and again prior to the finishing cut. The diamond dresser is the most efficient type of wheel dresser for truing wheels used in precision grinding. The diamond point is the only usable part of the diamond and must be inspected frequently for wear. Rotate the diamond slightly in the holder between dressings to keep the point sharp. A dull diamond will...

Preoperational Checks

Gibs should be as snug as possible and still allow the movement needed. Tighten all gibs not required for the operation being done to prevent movement and chatter. The adjusting bar on the back of the lathe carriage that holds the carriage onto the lathe bed should be snug enough to still allow a slight drag when feeding the lathe carriage. If the work is held between centers, they should be tight against the work and long pieces should be supported at the point where machining is being done....

Milling Square End Keyways

Conventional milling is recommended when using the Versa-Mil on a lathe as the lathe's feeds and bearings are not designed for upward pressure on the carriage. Cutting square end keyways Figure 9-18 can be accomplished with the Versa-Mil using a variety of different cutters and speeds. The Versa-Mil is usually set on top of the compound rest with the spindle of the Versa-Mil parallel with the travel of the compound rest. Select and mount the cutter to the appropriate arbor. A stagger tooth side...

Fly Cutting

Fly Cutter Tool

Fly cutting Figure 9-33 , also called single-point milling, is one of the most versatile milling operations available to the machinist. Fly cutting is done with a single-point cutting tool, like the lathe or shaper cutting tool, held in a fly cutting arbor. Formed cutters are not always available and there are times when special form cutters are needed only for a very limited number of parts or operations therefore, it is more economical to grind the desired form on a lathe cutter bit rather...

Gear Cutting with the Basic Unit and an Involute Gear Cutter

Milling Gear Cutting

In this setup, Figure 9-34, the gear blank is first turned to the correct diameter using a mandrel mounted between centers. The blank should remain on the mandrel after turning. The lathe dog should be wedged against the faceplate to eliminate backlash and the indexing head mounted to the lathe spindle to position the individual teeth. The basic unit is mounted on the compound rest with the faceplate parallel to the lathe center and an arbor with an involute gear cutter, stamped with the...

Tailstock Offset

Offset Tailstock

This type of angular milling is accomplished by squaring the unit to the tailstock spindle or faceplate. Normally, a shell end mill is used in this type of milling. Work is mounted between centers and the tailstock is offset to the desired angle for milling. The work may be rotated with the indexing head to mill additional surfaces on the workpiece. See Figure 929. riauri 9-19. 'I'mlsiock dli'sd ill i 11 in 4 riauri 9-19. 'I'mlsiock dli'sd ill i 11 in 4

Form Milling

Form milling is the process of machining special contours, composed of curves and straight lines or entirely of curves, in a single cut. Gear cutting may be considered form milling by definition however, the definition is usually restricted to the use of convex, concave, or corner rounding cutters. These form cutters are manufactured in a variety of radii and sizes and may be grouped or ganged together on an arbor to mill intricate shapes. Convex curved or rounded outward cutters mill concave...

Squaring the Versa Mil to the Lathe

For accurate milling cuts, it is necessary to square the Versa-Mil to the lathe Figure 9-17 . The front compound face of the Versa-Mil is a reference surface machined in relation to the spindle. A square can be set across this face and squared to the chuck or face plate of the lathe. For work between centers, the Versa-Mil can be squared to the workpiece. After the machine has been squared on the compound rest of the lathe, the compound rest can be loosened for adjusting the spindle to various...

Tapered Spindle Grinder

Internal Grinding Taper

For shallow and small diameter holes up to 6 inches in depth, use the tapered spindle internal grinder. Tapers may also be ground on the work by using either the taper attachment or the compound rest. See Figure 9-40. The deep-hole grinder with the extended housing offers a rigid precision grinder for holes as deep as 18 inches. Tapers may also be ground with the deep-hole grinder. See Figure 941. The Versa-Mil external grinder with the wheel guard removed may be used for internal grinding of...

Cylindrical Grinding

Cylindrical Grinding Techniques

The lengths and diameters of shafts ground on a lathe are determined by the lathe swing and the distance between the lathe centers. Mount the Versa-Mil on the compound rest with the face of the basic unit parallel to the work surface. In cylindrical grinding Figure 9-39 , the work rotates slowly while the wheel rotates close to the highest allowable speed. The wheel should never leave the work at either end of the cut in order to produce a smooth surface free of wheel marks. Direct the spark...

External Grinding Attachment

The external grinding head Figure 9-2 bolts to the face of the Versa-Mil making the unit a precision external grinder. The head adjusts to 30 degrees range of angle to either side. A flat belt from the motor provides power to the head for smooth operation. Different pulley diameters allow matching spindle speeds to the grinding wheel size and rating. A wheel guard on the head offers protection to the operator from debris coming off the wheel during grinding. Figure 9-2. Fxlenial yiimjirig...

Slotting

Slotting with the Versa-Mil Figure 9-32 covers a wide variety of operations from milling long wide slots in material to cutting curved or thin slots. Workpieces may be mounted in the lathe chuck or between centers for slotting operation. Longitudinal slots along a shaft or other large piece may be cut in the material in the same manner as milling keyways with end mills. It is often desirable to use a cutter smaller than the width of the slot. The reason for this is, when the cutter is as wide...

Universal Milling Head

The universal milling head Figure 9-7 mounts to the face of the Versa-Mil and is driven by the spindle of the basic unit. This feature eliminates the need for special belts and permits the head to operate at any angle. The milling head and the basic unit have the same spindle taper and use the same arbors. With the universal head, machining can be performed along the side of the work, allowing the machining of much larger parts. Angular operations such as thread milling can easily be performed...

Spline Milling Internal

After a hub or gear has been drilled and bored to the finished internal minor diameter, internal splines may be cut into the hub or gear by using the Versa-Shaper Figure 9-31 . The indexing head provides the means to locate each spline to be cut. For this operation, the milling is continued until the desired class of fit is obtained. For field expedience, it is best to machine the mating parts to match if possible. Figure 9-31. Spline milling internal spline. Figure 9-31. Spline milling...

Centering the Cutter

To center the cutter over the work, first ensure the backlash is removed from the cross slide. Next, start the Versa-Mil and reference the cutter to the side of the work using a paper shim. Zero the cross feed dial then, raise the Versa--Mil above the top of the work. To determine the distance the cutter must move, add one-half of the diameter of the cutter plus one-half the diameter of the workpiece plus the thickness of the paper shim. Keep in mind some latches only move half the distance...

Internal Keyseater and Slotter

Internal Key Seater

This unit bolts to the face of the Versa-Mil and is driven by the basic unit spindle. The An internal keyseater and slotter Figure 9-8 commonly called a Versa-Shaper, bolts to the face of the Versa-Mil Versa-Shaper operates in any angular position and in either direction of stroke for cutting internal keyways, slotting, or shaping. The stroke length adjusts from 0 to 4 inches with a speed of 44 to 450 strokes per minute. Tool holders for l 8, 3 16, 1 4, 5 16, and 1 2 cutters are available for...

Internal Grinding Attachment

A wide variety of internal grinding jobs can be handled on a lathe with the Versa-Mil basic unit and the internal grinding unit Figure 9-3 . The internal grinding attachment bolts to the face of the basic unit and is driven by a flat belt from the motor. The internal grinder handles grinding wheels from 5 8 inch to 2 1 2 inches in diameter and grinds to a depth of 4 inches. Five different speeds are available to match the spindle speed to the grinding wheel diameter and rating. Figure 9-3....

General Description

The milling-grinding-drilling and slotting attachment is commonly referred to as a Versa-Mil. It is a compact, portable unit capable of doing many machining operations that normally require expensive single-purpose machines. With the different attachments that are available with the unit, drilling, shaping, milling, and grinding can be performed quickly and inexpensively. This self-powered, vertical-feed, variable-speed precision tool may be mounted in any position on the carriage, table, ram,...

Depth of

Start the Versa-Mil and reference the cutter to the top of the workpiece using a paper shim. The depth of cut equals one-half the key thickness plus the chordal height plus the thickness of the paper shim. Tables for chordal height may be found in the new American Machinist's Handbook or Machinery's Handbook. A simple approximate formula for chordal height is key thickness squared, divided by four times the shaft diameter. After the depth of cut is determined and set, tighten the post binding...

Indexing Head

Lathe Milling Gear Cutting Attachment

The indexing head Figure 9-10 mounts in the lathe head stock spindle to index work held in the lathe chuck, collet, or between lathe centers. The indexing head mandrel locks into a 1 1 8-inch or larger spindle bore however, adapters for other bores are available. Forty turns of the dividing head crank rotates the lathe spindle one revolution. The indexing plate has 18 circles of holes allowing for divisions to be made in degrees, number of sides, or the number of teeth on gears or splines....

Straddle Milling

Straddle Milling

Straddle milling Figure 9-30 is the machining of two parallel surfaces in a single cut by using two cutters separated by spacers, washers, or shims. Use straddle milling in spline milling or the cutting of squares or hexagons on the end of a cylindrical workpiece. The workpiece is mounted between centers to mill splines on a shaft and mounted in the lathe chuck to mill squares or hexagons. In both cases, the indexing head is used to rotate the work after each cut.

Adapter Base Mounting

When a lower mounting of the Versa-Mil unit is required, the compound rest can be removed and replaced with a special adapter base Figure 9-12 that mounts directly on the cross-slide. The base plates are semifinished and may require drilling two mounting bolt holes and a pivot pin hole. The location of these holes depends upon the lathe model and size. The base plate adapter should be used for operations on or below the centerline of the workpiece. Such operations include milling keyways along...

Safety Precautions

Safety in the shop area or around power equipment cannot be overemphasized. Each piece of equipment has safety procedures unique to that particular piece of equipment. Listed below are safety procedures that pertain to the Versa-Mil. Avoid dangerous environments. Do not use the Versa-Mil in damp or wet locations. Do not expose the Versa-Mil to rain. Keep visitors away from running equipment. Keep visitors a safe distance from the Versa-Mil while it is in operation. Store tools when not in use....

Drilling

Many drilling and boring operations not ordinarily possible on the lathe are easily performed with the Versa-Mil mounted on the lathe. The Versa-Mil is usually fed by hand using either the either carriage, cross slide, or compound rest. Check the operators manual supplied with the Versa-Mil for information concerning power feeding when drilling. Off-center drilling and boring may be performed by positioning the Versa-Mil spindle parallel with the lathe axis and maneuvering the drill by means of...

Spline Milling External

Splines are often used instead of keys and keyways to transmit power from the shaft to a hub or gear. Splines are a series of parallel keys and keyways evenly spaced around a shaft or interior of a hub. Splines allow the hub to slide on the shaft either under load or freely. This feature is found in transmissions, automotive mechanisms, and machine tool drives. Manufactured splines are generally cut by bobbing and broaching however, this discussion will be limited to field expedient methods....

Dovetail Milling

Cutter Angle Work

When cutting dovetails with the Versa-Mil, the workpiece is usually held in the lathe chuck or mounted on a face plate. The tongue or groove of the dovetail is first roughed out using a side milling cutter, after which the angular sides and base are finished with the dovetail cutter. See Figure 9-26. Angular milling may also be accomplished on the Versa-Mil by squaring the Versa-Mil on the compound rest and setting the compound rest to the desired angle. With this method of angular milling, the...

Woodruff Keyslot Milling

Lathe Chuck With Milling Cutter

Milling Woodruff keyslots Figure 9-25 in shafts is very similar to milling straight keyways in the basic setup, centering the cutter, and feed rate. The only difference in milling a Woodruff keyslot is that the carriage must be locked down in addition to the cross slide, if cutting from the top of the workpiece, to prevent the basic unit from moving during milling. Cutting a Woodruff keyslot is relatively simple since the proper size cutter has the same diameter and width of the key to be...

Versamil Basic Unit

Versamail Universal Head

The Versa-Mil basic unit Figure 9-1 has a powered machining head which moves vertically on four hardened ground guide posts by means of a precision-ground lead screw calibrated to 0.001 inch. Thirteen different speeds are available to the head through the use of different size pulleys to accommodate all types of machining and cutter sizes within the range of the unit. The circular T-slot on the face of the basic unit accommodates a variety of attachments. The graduation marks on the basic unit...